Red Helmet Training
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Red Helmet Training ® 10601 Church Street #107, Rancho Cucamonga, CA
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​Small Unit Leadership - AM Session 8:30 to Noon
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Small Unit Leadership
March 11, 2021
8:30 AM to Noon
Building an Effective Team
March 11, 2021
1 PM to 4:30
Class Flyer
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class flyer to distribute
Register Here
One critical aspect of an officer’s development is a firm understanding of leadership and specific to the company officer in the fire service, small-unit leadership. We’ll draw comparisons to small-unit leadership in the military but without drawing comparisons to General Mattis, Schwarzkopf, or Patton. We are going to talk about the skills a young Corporal or Sergeant needs to effectively lead a group of two to four. This is a number similar to what comes off the rig at oh-dark in anywhere America responding to a 911 call with limited information, compressed timelines, and insufficient resources. Those skills, traits, and characteristics define the ability to transition between direct supervision and task-level action and are the absolute bedrock for success on the street. And success on the street does not happen without success in the firehouse, where small-unit leadership begins.​
Class Flyer
For a PDF Copy of the 
class flyer to distribute
​Building a Team - PM Session - 1 to 4:30 PM
Just lead. A simple statement that implies that leadership is simple. It isn’t. Part of being an effective leader is to first build an effective team. It is not just a matter of telling people to work well together. The age-old axiom that applies, “if it was easy, anyone could do it”. It ain’t easy. In order for any crew to achieve success on the fireground, they must first achieve success in the firehouse. That success is measured in how much they trust the leader, as well as the team they are working with. In order to achieve that trust a leader must understand what goes into the ideas and concepts behind team development, formation and lifecycle, and cohesion. We will explore these elements and more, drawing on experiences born from the fire service and the military so that they can be applied in a very specific environment, the firehouse. Achieving that goal is what allows effective fireground leaders to apply their craft on the street, without it, you’ve got a herd of individuals destined to fail.​
Marc is a thirty-five year public servant with over eight years in the Marine Corps and twenty-seven in fire and rescue. He served as a volunteer in North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Maryland and is a twenty-five year veteran of Fairfax County Fire & Rescue Department where he is a Captain. In Fairfax he spent eighteen years on the line as a firefighter, paramedic, engine/truck driver and truck officer. With an earlier assignment to the Training Division as a Basic Training Officer he was assigned back and charged with standing up an Officer Development Training Unit for the Department. He teaches regionally and nationally on leadership and tactical fieldcraft and coordinates multiple training opportunities for aspiring and incumbent officers. The culmination of his time in public service is the keen understanding that in any environment effective training is what leads to effective outcomes. ​
​Marc Davidson Bio
Marc Davidson